King Aerospace BBJ Business Continues Strong Growth - King Aerospace
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King Aerospace BBJ Business Continues Strong Growth

 

DALLAS, TX – King Aerospace Commercial Corporation was on track to complete work on 20 Boeing aircraft in 2018. Instead, it completed 29. Scope included routine maintenance, avionics, paint and interior modifications for Boeing Business Jets (BBJs), Boeing 737s and Boeing 757s.

“Significant investments in tooling, equipment, facilities and training have positioned us to serve Boeing aircraft extremely efficiently and effectively,” says Jarid King, president of King Aerospace Companies. “We’re earning a reputation for high-quality, value-priced support.”

Boeing acknowledged that status by nominating King Aerospace as a Supplier of the Year. Winners will be announced at the end of February.

“One of our cornerstone principles is quality in everything – no excuses,” says King. “Our work reflects that.”

Maintenance comprises the company’s highest percentage of Boeing aircraft support. King Aerospace is an authorized GE OnPoint™ service center, offering aircraft engine maintenance and repair for CFM56*-7B-powered BBJs and performing a range of on-wing maintenance. This includes line maintenance inspections, routine installed engine maintenance, removal and replacement of engines and engine components.

Avionics is also a key service. Last spring, King Aerospace completed the industry’s first BBJ Gogo 4G installation in addition to a SATCOM SRD system upgrade. It has also installed Ka-band phased-array, SATCOM antenna systems. It is currently working on a supplemental type certificate (STC) with Collins Aerospace’s for primary flight display synthetic vision.

KACC has capabilities in completing VIP interior re-fabrications, VIP surface finishing, and interior modifications. Paint continues to be a strong core offering. The process for a previously painted aircraft involves painstaking sanding and stripping, masking non-painted areas with tape and other materials, priming, painting with often custom-mixed colors, applying any stripes, lettering and logos and a final coat of protective paint.

“Customers can hardly believe our craftsmanship – and the beautiful finished product, routinely delivered on time and on budget,” says King. “Their satisfaction has led to our strong growth.”

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